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Posts tagged ‘Social Media’

13
Apr

10 Jobs in 1: The Life of an Internal Community Manager

Last night, I was having dinner with some folks in my social circle.  One of them exclaimed, “Good news! We FINALLY get to hire an internal community manager.”  We all raised a glass to toast the victory. See, he had been battling to get a headcount to manage his social intranet for years.

Based on his struggle, I decided to develop the Top 10 Roles of an Internal Community Manager.

Now, for some huge Social Business software customers these will come as no surprise, but at smaller companies with more modest resources, an FTE might bust the budget. In these cases, carving out a partial responsibility and making it official reduces the danger of the social intranet becoming beloved in concept but largely shelf ware.

So, here’s the list of the Top 10 Internal Community Manager Roles they often juggle:

HiRes.jpg1. Ambassador. One of the biggest drivers of social business success is company culture. Community managers help form a successful company culture by being open, responsive, and strategic.

2. Unifier. Community managers helps unite distributed leadership on the best practices for internal collaboration.

3. Builder. Skilled managers focus on best ways to structure and design for interaction and engagement. They also stimulate conversation and have content plans until the community matures.

4. Coach. They are excellent at articulating how employees can use the new technology to accomplish real business objectives, without leaving their comfort zone (which often means their email inboxes).

5. Cheerleader. Community managers often bust out the virtual pompoms.  They reward positive behavior.

6. Leader. One of the most important jobs of the community manager is to identify effective volunteer advocates and facilitators for various units (marketing, sales, finance, R&D, manufacturing, etc.). Without these foot soldiers, the community will not take flight.

7. Game Maker.  No, I’m not referring to Panem! Community managers come up with awesome techniques to keep employees engaged and reward the most active contributors or the executives who “get it.”

8. Listener. Community managers understand better than anyone the “pulse” of the employee base.  They often can be the voice of the masses when it comes to marketing ideas, product features, etc.

9. Governor. Community managers help develop and enforce social media guidelines.

10. Analyzer. Successful community managers can help point to real business value (ie. Employee satisfaction, productivity improvements, increase in sales, etc).  They can also do predictive modeling based on sentiment, help find the true expert in a given area, and understand valuable enterprise relationships.

I want to hear from the Internal Community ManagersWhat’s the biggest value you bring to your organization?

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7
Mar

Social Listening on Super Tuesday

Yesterday was Super Tuesday in the United States.  It was almost exciting as the Superbowl in my house.  Throughout college, I worked for a state senator and then started my professional career off in public affairs.  For 24 hours, I was glued to the results of the Republican presidential primary.

I was especially excited to see the social statistics on this important day because as William Powers of Bluefin Labs stated, “social media is the frontier of democracy.”

Even if you aren’t a social media geek like me, it was impossible to login to Twitter, Facebook or even Instagram and not get overwhelmed by the amount of social buzz surrounding the candidates.  So I decided to setup a monitor using Jive Fathom Pro (which thanks to our community manager Ryan Rutan you can now download the app on the Jive Community), to see who generated the most social buzz.  I wanted to keep my sources small, so I just looked at Facebook and Twitter updates.

Official Results

Before I share the social stats, let’s look at the official results:

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Social Mentions

As you can see above, all of the candidates failed to break out from the pack.  This was not the case for social.  Rick Santorum was the clear front runner, with Mitt Romney and Newt Gingrich tied for second, and Ron Paul coming in last in terms of overall social mentions.

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Sentiment

However, pure mentions, weren’t enough for me to analyze.  I also wanted to see general sentiment score. In Fathom the scale is from -100 to 100, negative to positive.  The data below shows that while Santorum had more mentions he had less positive tweets and status updates than the other candidates.

  • Romney: 9.88
  • Gingrich: 9.88
  • Paul: 9.63
  • Santorum: 7.13

Conversations

Since social is more than just numbers and data, here is a collection of some of the more interesting updates. (NOTE: I’m not taking sides, just pointing out some interesting conversations).

 

From the Candidates:

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From the General Public:

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We’ve Already Moved On…

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Did you do anything special for Super Tuesday on social media sites?

18
Jan

The New Way to IPO

In my role at Jive, I’m responsible for the head-spinning job of doing social media marketing for the social business leader. In other words, up until recently, my parents had no idea what I did for a living. But that all changed when I helped market Jive’s IPO.

The core philosophy of our social program at Jive is to Engage Employees, Engage Customers, and Engage the Social Web in order to help accomplish real business objectives. This mantra came to life as we reached a major corporate milestone. I’m always preaching that we should “Jive on Jive,” so I wanted to share with you a brief case study of how we used our own products to accomplish a New Way to IPO.

Engage Employees.

Marketing Enablement. As you can imagine, an IPO takes lots of internal coordination and collaboration between executives, finance, legal, marketing, etc. It was key to be able to find the people, content and expertise needed to coordinate this important event, so we utilized our own software. Additionally, using out-of-the-box features in Jive, we were able to centralize knowledge and set strict privacy controls. These measures ensured that only key employees and outside legal and financial contractors could discuss and stay updated on the IPO progress.

Executive Communications. During major checkpoints throughout the process, such as filing the S-1, the Jive executive team including our CEO, CFO and Chief Legal Counsel provided key updates to the entire company through their internal blogs. Each post simultaneously reached our 400 employees around the world and enabled them to comment in real-time with any questions or thoughts.

Corporate Culture. Jive wouldn’t be Jive without a little fun. To celebrate listing on the NASDAQ, our internal community manager and designers launched a fresh new theme. This was an easy and fun way for employees around the world to see the impact of the IPO.

Engage Customers

Jive Community. At Jive, we know this exciting day wouldn’t have been possible without our awesome customers; therefore, we paid tribute to them on the Jive Community. From the huge thank you banner to showcasing their tweets and videos, we wanted to celebrate with our community. Jive’s CEO Tony Zingale wrote a corporate blog post announcing the news, we had a livestream to the opening ceremony (as well as a YouTube video for those who missed it), and a place for the community to discuss the IPO.

In-Person Event. We also realized that as much as we love doing everything online, there is no replacing face-to-face interactions. Therefore, we invited key community members to be onsite at NASDAQ. They live blogged the event, recorded time capsule video messages, and celebrated with by toasting each other and Jive executives.

Engage The Social Web.

Social Media Monitoring. Throughout the entire IPO process, we used Jive’s social media monitoring application Fathom Pro. This tool enabled us to mine the social Web for corporate mentions; identify key influencers and PR opportunities; and quickly uncover conversations impacting the brand. We were also able to analyze the effectiveness of product campaigns during the quiet period.

Social Media Marketing. Obviously, one of our business objectives was to share and monitor the exciting news; however, this was more than a public relations campaign. We also wanted to bridge the physical and digital worlds so that we could thank and celebrate with our entire ecosystem of employees, customers, partners and investors. Since we couldn’t bring everyone to the Big Apple, we decided to bring it to them. We created a unique Twitter hashtag for the occasion – #jiveipo – and invited folks to join the online conversation. We gathered, moderated, and then displayed tweets on the 7-story NASDAQ building in Times Square. We also had a livestream video display so that people could see themselves appear in Times Square and share it with their social networks. Beyond the marquee, we posted live updates to Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn that included rich-media like photos and YouTube videos ( Jive Lists on NASDAQ – Opening Ceremony – YouTube).

Obviously, this social effort required the help of all-stars throughout the company including executives, the internal and external community managers, designers and developers, marketers, etc. And as an end-user of Jive since 2007, this was an extremely special day for me personally. I was thrilled to be able to showcase the power of Jive during an awesome event. Comment below with your questions and feedback!

21
Aug

Music + Social Business = Love

Everyone says, “I love music” but I REALLY love music. I own more than 2k CDs, and last year I saw exactly 88 live performances.

Part of my obsession stems from years of watching Austin City Limits on PBS. I still remember the first time I set foot in the original studio as a student at The University of Texas and my first show there-Corrine Bailey Ray.

As you can image, I was  thrilled when the social media club asked me to participate on a Social Business Panel on the ACL Stage! I was joined by all-star performers:

Even though I love evangelizing the new way to work, this particular event had me a bit nervous for the following reasons:

1. Austin has the biggest SMC behind San Francisco.

2. I would be on the same stage where Willie Nelson got his start. I couldn’t mess this up!

3. The panel was filled with some of my closest professional contacts, yet we all work for competitive solutions.

But when I walked into that studio, all of my anxiety went away.  I saw the lights from the fake, out-dated, Austin skyline and realized this was an amazing opportunity for a music-lover like me to talk about the thing I’m most passionate about – social business.

After I got the first question, “What is Social Business?” I settled into my chair and had a blast.  Not only was I extremely proud of the way I represented the company that I’ve loved since 2007, but I learned from my fellow panelists, got to network with innovators, and helped people just starting off on the amazing social business journey.

Thanks, Social Media Club Austin for an awesome event!  You can watch a recording of the panel here. (It starts about 10 minutes into the recording).

23
May

Voice of the Customer Conference

Last week, I met with several Voice of the Customer professionals and customer intelligence experts at the Allegiance Engage Summit in Park City, Utah. One of the highlights of the day (beside SNOW IN MAY) included a presentation by author and former Apple chief evangelist Guy Kawasaki.

I wanted to share with you guys, Guy’s keynote address based on his latest book “The Art of Enchantment.”  He provided attendees with creative ways that businesses can become more likeable and trustworthy while engaging customers and winning more business. He pointed out that companies should “remove the speed bumps” and make it easier for customers to do business with them.

Here is a shortened version of his presentation I found online: